Star Wars goes Steampunk

Star Wars goes Steampunk

Have you ever wondered what your favorite “Star Wars” characters would look like with a steampunk makeover?
Thanks to artist Bjorn Hurri, you can!

Hurri wrote to The Huffington Post: “There is nothing like being able to create worlds and characters that people will enjoy, and I think the ‘Steampunk Star Wars’ illustrations were really good fun as it gave me an opportunity to pay tribute to one of the best movies out there while giving it my personal twist.”
If you’re wondering why “Star Wars” villain Darth Vader is missing, Hurri says he’s a work in progress. “I continuously redo him over and over again because I feel like the essence of him is hard to nail,” he wrote. “He is such an evil character I want to make sure I pay proper respect to the original design.”

May The SteamForce be with you!

http://www.bjornhurri.com/
http://bjornhurri.cghub.com/

The first computer was Steampunk.

The first computer was Steampunk.

Quite possibly the first personal computer concept – a steel and metal, steam-powered machine the size of a small train engine – was the perspective of Charles Babbage, an English founder and math master who passed away in 1872. His Analytical Engine was a general purpose pc with just 1 kb of memory (500,000 times less than the storage of an iPhone 4 and 13,000 times slower than the first desktop pc presented in 1981). Unfortunately, Babbage’s idea never got past the planning stage and a model was never designed.

steampunk computer 500x281 The first computer was Steampunk.

The first computer was Steampunk.

Until now. David Graham-Cumming, a pc developer and manager of something called Plan 28 – said he will try to increase the necessary funds through private contributions to build an Analytical Engine exactly as Babbage thought it. He reports the venture will take ten years and $8 million to complete. Babbage had other big ideas, too, such as the Difference Engine No. 1, a calculating device. The English govt showed early interest but cut off financing in 1842. None of Babbage’s inventions were ever fully designed.

Thanks to Ken Hall at The Journal of Antiques and Collectibles.

Steampunk headdress by Natsumi Suzuki

Steampunkheaddress1 Small Steampunk headdress by Natsumi Suzuki

Steampunk headdress by Natsumi Suzuki

Steampunkheaddress3 150x150 Steampunk headdress by Natsumi Suzuki  

Natsumi Suzuki is a dancer from Tokyo, Japan, inhabiting San Francisco since 2007. Her focus is on combining the elements of Traditional Japanese Culture with Hip Hop and Tribal Fusion Belly Dance.

Classically trained in ballet as a child and expanding into hip hop dance in her teens, she also studied Club Jazz and Pop Lockin’ i.e.- Moon Walking, Robotic movements, and street dancing.

While Natsumi has been in San Francisco, her passion for knowledge and improving her skills has led her to study belly dance and tribal fusion vigorously for the past 5 years with Jill Parker, Rachel Brice, Kami Liddle, Mira Betz, Suhaila Salimpour, Andrea Sendek, Ariellah, Deb Rubin and Zoe Jakes. She has received Certification Level 1 from Suhaila Salimpour and also certification from Rachel Brice’s 8 Elements™ Intensive1 Exams.

Steampunkheaddress22 150x150 Steampunk headdress by Natsumi Suzuki Some highlighted performances by Natsumi Suzuki include: Tribal Massive Spectacular with Mira Betz, Salon L’Orient starring Rachel Brice and the San Francisco Asian Art Museum VIP reception.

Now Natsumi is on tour with The Dolomites traveling all over the US, combining her fusion performance with their global sounds.
Natsumi also stars in The Dolomites’ music video “Queen of the Game.”
(You can check it “VIDEOS” page.)

Visit her site : http://natsumisuzuki.com/